Wednesday, October 3, 2012

God Grew Tired of Us - Payas

3 comments:

  1. Payas explained the theme of the documentary very clearly. The narrative she gave of the “lost boys of Sudan”—the boys that uprooted themselves from their lives and came to the United States to free themselves from the unrest of their own country was beautifully told. I felt connected to the story and I haven’t seen the documentary, so in that regard, Payas did an excellent job. She also told this piece in under 2.5 minutes; it cut straight to the central action of the plot.
    The volume of the review was excellent. It was clear that Payas replayed her video to ensure the proper volume. The pacing however, seemed a bit choppy and robotic to me. It didn’t sound as natural as her vlog video did. That being said, the pacing in no way detracted from the content of the video in any sizable way. I would consider this aspect a non-issue, as it did no detriment to the message Payas so clearly conveyed.
    Payas seemed very informed about the Sudan government and how they are treating their citizens. She discussed the structure and substructures of Sudan’s government, and particularly addressed the lack of order in Sudan, caused by violent people who do things like stab Sudanese people in the intestines to make them infertile. She addressed how governmental structures, such as police forces, were inept at addressing this problem. Her apparent knowledge on the subject made her come across as an authority figure (or close to it). At points I felt more like I was listening to a lecture on Sudanese governmental problems than watching a movie review. The informed quality of the review naturally lent itself to the confidence that Payas clearly displayed.
    An interesting point that Payas brought up was the fact that Sudan did not have a democracy. She discussed the fact that Sudan’s government was democratic by neither the pluralist model nor the majoritarian model. She stated that the government was authoritarian. She connected the governmental set-up to the issue of the mistreatment of the citizens (in particular the “lost boys”), by implying that the authoritarian style of government was cause for some of the egregious abuses by the government of Sudan. Payas also did an excellent job explaining the complex relationship between the Arab government of Sudan and the Christian blacks. She briefly highlighted this religion-inspired power struggle that is at the heart of much of the fighting in Sudan. This important fact sheds light on the causes of many human rights abuses that have clearly arisen from fighting between the groups in Sudan, and is an interesting point.
    The film sounded remarkably interesting to me because I do not know much about the causes of fighting in Africa. I also find it eye-opening to see how others live in comparison to how Americans live. Payas did a good job of explaining that the hardships faced by the Sudanese are the focus of this film. I think that a major strength of the film seems to be that director avoided bias. I can imagine that it would be difficult to portray a religious struggle in an impartial way. The fact that the director was able to maintain a human-interest angle without offering criticism of either party is remarkable in and of itself. A major weakness does seem to be that the hardships of women in Sudan were almost totally glossed over by the film.
    Payas also did a nice job of adding her own commentary to that given by the film. In addition to answering the questions are providing information about the issues in Sudan, Payas also contrasted them to life in America. She discussed how the boys didn’t even know how to use a toilet or what potato chips were. I think this was a nice addition, because it helped the viewer of the review to connect with the story before seeing the film, which will likely make them (and made me) want to see it. I also liked that Payas looked professional and refrained from distracting behavior (playing with hair, chewing pencil, ect.) during her review. At no point did her body language detract from her words.

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  2. I thought her volume was pretty good. she was informed, confident and enthusiastic about the film, God Grew Tired of Us. Her enthusiasm made her video fun to watch. Payas knew what she was talking about, and was prepared, although she kind of stumbles on her words a few times. The pace of the video is pretty good and easy to follow, however it could have been a little slower and more fluent. I understood the theme of the documentary to be the hardships that sudan boys faced during the civil war, the journey of three boys, and the cultural shock they faced when they came to the United States. I think Payas did a good job summarizing the documentary, and analyzing it.

    Payas mentioned that a strength of the documentary was that their was no bias in the film, and the director did not favor either side of the civil war. I thought this was interesting because a lot of documentaries tend to have bias, and it would be hard for documentary relating to religion and a war not to be bias. The only weakness she could think of was that the film did not really address the treatment of the girls. I thought that another strength of the film could be that there was only one weakness, which seemed to be small.

    There were a few facts about the film that Payas mentioned that i thought were interesting and significant. Firstly that the civil war was between the Arabs in the north and Black Christians in the south, and that the war was ignited by religion and oil. That the government did nothing to help the lost boys of sudan, or protect its citizens so the lost boys fled from the country. Also that the government didn't have a good police force, and if they had the war mostly likely wouldn't have broken out, or lasted so long.
    Also the torturous and inhumane treatment of the lost boys in sudan during the war by soldiers. I think she did a good job relating the documentary to topics we discussed in class. Sudan lacks order and it isn't a democracy therefore the people don't have a say. She also said that Sudan isn't a pluralist or majoritarian democracy.

    Overall i though it was a good video evaluation. The film sounds really interesting, and touching. I would definitely like to watch the film, and I am interested to see the culture shock that the lost boys faced when they came to the United States. I also think the film would be interesting, because i personally don't know much about this topic. As more of a side note I thought that the fire detector/chirping sound in the background was a little distracting, however, it did not take away from the overall quality of the video. I terms of style, i liked that Payas added her own thoughts.

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  3. I thought her volume was pretty good. she was informed, confident and enthusiastic about the film, God Grew Tired of Us. Her enthusiasm made her video fun to watch. Payas knew what she was talking about, and was prepared, although she kind of stumbles on her words a few times. The pace of the video is pretty good and easy to follow, however it could have been a little slower and more fluent. I understood the theme of the documentary to be the hardships that sudan boys faced during the civil war, the journey of three boys, and the cultural shock they faced when they came to the United States. I think Payas did a good job summarizing the documentary, and analyzing it.

    Payas mentioned that a strength of the documentary was that their was no bias in the film, and the director did not favor either side of the civil war. I thought this was interesting because a lot of documentaries tend to have bias, and it would be hard for documentary relating to religion and a war not to be bias. The only weakness she could think of was that the film did not really address the treatment of the girls. I thought that another strength of the film could be that there was only one weakness, which seemed to be small.

    There were a few facts about the film that Payas mentioned that i thought were interesting and significant. Firstly that the civil war was between the Arabs in the north and Black Christians in the south, and that the war was ignited by religion and oil. That the government did nothing to help the lost boys of sudan, or protect its citizens so the lost boys fled from the country. Also that the government didn't have a good police force, and if they had the war mostly likely wouldn't have broken out, or lasted so long.
    Also the torturous and inhumane treatment of the lost boys in sudan during the war by soldiers. I think she did a good job relating the documentary to topics we discussed in class. Sudan lacks order and it isn't a democracy therefore the people don't have a say. She also said that Sudan isn't a pluralist or majoritarian democracy.

    Overall i though it was a good video evaluation. The film sounds really interesting, and touching. I would definitely like to watch the film, and I am interested to see the culture shock that the lost boys faced when they came to the United States. I also think the film would be interesting, because i personally don't know much about this topic. As more of a side note I thought that the fire detector/chirping sound in the background was a little distracting, however, it did not take away from the overall quality of the video. I terms of style, i liked that Payas added her own thoughts.

    ReplyDelete